Water Quality

Consumer Confidence Water Quality Reports

Customers and water quality come first at Northern Kentucky Water District. NKWD drinking water meets all of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) health standards. Our lab analysts gather water samples from over 150 locations each month. This is more than federal and state regulations require, but we want to make sure that we have an accurate picture of the water quality.

Download a Past Report:

EPA Approved Drinking Water

NKWD drinking water meets all of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) health standards. Our lab analysts gather water samples from over 180 locations each month. This is far more than federal and state regulations require, but we want to make sure that we have an accurate picture of the water quality.
View the Consumer Confidence Report

Northern Kentucky Water District
Northern Kentucky Water District

Pharmaceutical Drop-off Locations

Dispose of your expired or unused prescription medications at a local pharmaceutical collection box near you. Drug disposal is anonymous and items can be dropped off during regular business hours. Bring prescription medication to the police department in its original packaging.

Erlanger Police 505 Commonwealth Ave 727-7599
Kenton County Police 11777 Madison Pike 392-1940
Villa Hills Police 719 Rogers Rd 341-3535
Park Hills Police 1106 Amsterdam Rd 431-6172
Fort Wright Police 409 Kyle's Ln 331-2191
Fort Thomas Police 130 N. Ft. Thomas Ave 441-6562
Newport Police 998 Monmouth St 292-3622
Edgewood Police 385 Dudley Rd 331-5911
Campbell County Police 8774 Constable Dr 547-3100
Florence Government Center 8100 Ewing Blvd 371-5491
Boone County Sheriff's Office 3000 Conrad Ln 334-2175
Highland Heights City Bldg 176 Johns Hill Rd 441-8575

Background:

When used as intended, pharmaceuticals applied externally or ingested have the potential to be excreted or washed into sewage systems. In addition, unused pharmaceuticals are often directly flushed into sewage systems. Wastewater treatment plants and septic systems usually do not treat or only partially treat pharmaceuticals, so chemical compounds from pharmaceuticals pass through treatment plants or septic systems to our rivers or groundwater.

Environmental Concerns:

Recent research shows that pharmaceutical compounds exist in our environment both as a result of improper disposal of unused pharmaceuticals and because they are excreted by the person using the medication.

Alternative Disposal Recommendations:

  • DO dispose of waste pharmaceuticals, including chemotherapeutic wastes, in the garbage that is intended for a permitted solid waste landfill or incinerator.

  • DO NOT dispose of pharmaceuticals down a drain or toilet.

  • DO NOT burn household waste containing pharmaceuticals.

  • Place needles, syringes, lancets, and other sharp objects in a hard plastic or metal container with a tightly secured lid.

  • Before discarding the container, make sure to reinforce the lid with heavy-duty tape.

  • DO NOT use clear plastic or glass containers.

  • Soiled bandages, disposable sheets, and medical gloves should be placed in securely fashioned plastic bags before you put them in the garbage can with the other trash.

  • NEVER pour chemotherapy medications down the drain or onto the ground. These medications can be toxic to wildlife and to the bacteria needed to maintain your septic system. Instead, ask your physician about a way to dispose of these medications that are environmentally safe.

Northern Kentucky Water District

Federal Guidelines:

Take unused, unneeded, or expired prescription drugs out of their original containers and throw them in the trash.

Mixing prescription drugs with an undesirable substance, such as used coffee grounds or kitty litter, and putting them in impermeable, nondescript containers, such as empty cans or sealable bags will further ensure the drugs are not diverted.

Take advantage of community pharmaceutical take-back programs that allow the public to bring unused drugs to a central location for proper disposal. Some communities have pharmaceutical take-back programs or community solid waste programs that allow the public to bring unused drugs to a central location for proper disposal. Where these exist, they are a good way to dispose of unused pharmaceuticals.